Florabank Resources

Final Report for Land and Water Australia Managing Climate Variability Program
This project aimed to provide information enabling revegetation providers and commercial forestry operations across Australia to improve on-the-ground establishment outcomes. Through experiments, data collection, modelling and community consultation, it has identified key strategies that reduce the risk of establishment failure from adverse climatic conditions. These are dominated by the primary strategy of ensuring adequate initial (at-planting) soil moisture via effective forward- planning and site management.
Reports
Genebank Standards
FAO and IBPGR have been cooperating since the early seventies to strengthen national capabilities in ex situ conservation of plant genetic resources, including the development of agreements and network activities with institutions that had accepted primary responsibility for long-term conservation of germplasm of particular species in their base collections.
Technical
Hand Direct Sowing Data Sheet
An alternative to mechanical sowing is the hand or “niche” sowing technique. This involves little in the way of soil disturbance and allows for more controlled placement of plants within a site. Hand sowing is also useful for smaller revegetation jobs, on steep slopes and in areas where machinery cannot or should not go. Depending on the locations and methods used, hand sowing is as efficient as other planting methods. As a guide, 800 to 1500 plants can be sown per day per person and trials indicate that a 90% success rate is achievable for some species.
Technical
It is a widely held assumption that plants used in revegetation projects should be derived from "local provenance" seed. Throughout the last twenty years or so this notion has been a central tenet of the extension literature in government funded natural resource management programs such as Landcare. On the whole I believe this assumption is based on unjustified and tenuous interpretations of the related scientific literature.
Technical
This paper presents some of FloraBank’s findings about the way native seed is collected, stored and handled at the community level. Based on our experiences and the close relationship between FloraBank and the Bushcare Support network, this paper also provides insights into community issues and attitudes to the availability and quality of native seed for revegetation and conservation purposes.
Reports
A protocol to determine seed storage behaviour
Because of the increased inter- est to conserve a wide range of species, including forestry spe- cies, the need to know how to handle and conserve the seeds of a given species in an optimum and cost-efficient way has be- come very pertinent. It is hoped that this publication will help genebank staff and other scientists in their duties to conserve the dwindling resources in a more secured and effective way.
Regional_Guidelines
The Effect of Sowing Season on the Reliability of Direct Seeding
Direct seeding is a common and important revegetation practice used throughout temperate Australia. This report examines the effect of direct seeding at different times of the year on germination and survival of native tree and shrub species at two sites. The trials showed that some species have better survival when sown in a particular season. This has implications for direct seeding practitioners, who need to make regular observations of their own sowings to determine the preferred season for the species that they use.
Technical
SEED PRODUCTION AREAS - An Answer to Native Seed Shortages
Seed Production Areas (SPAs) are areas where native plants of known seed source are grown to produce seed. This can be done using a horticultural type method or as part of a mixed biodiversity planting. Greening Australia (GA) is encouraging and assisting landmanagers to establish SPAs to bolster the supply of understorey species and complement the seed sourced from wild populations or Seed Collection Areas (SCAs).
General
A number of recent publications in the list at the end of this article provide detailed information on the subjects of seed collection, storage and handling. Most of the listed references are books or review articles which provide many other original references on these subjects. Rather than paraphrasing these references, most of which are readily available, I have listed below in point form the areas that should be considered, and indicated which references relate to each area.
Technical
Acacia dealbata Silver Wattle
Tree to 30m high in forests and along watercourses or shrub on drier sites. Bark usually smooth (fissured at the base of old trunks only), grey-green or dark grey to almost black. Branchlets often glaucous. Leaves bipinnate, usually bluish-grey with 10-30 pairs of pinnae and a gland at the junction of each pair of pinnae.
Regional_Guidelines
Developing Seed Production Areas for native plants
The increased use of direct seeding techniques in the revegetation industry has created a demand for diverse, provenance based indigenous seed. Seed is currently supplied foremost from roadsides and private property. With a high demand and seasonal impacts causing poor or reduced seed set, supply is often limited and labour intensive to collect. Collection often needs to be timed carefully to capture seed from some species which may drop seed quickly.
General
Defining seed collection ranges for indigenous plants
This guideline is intended for those who are involved in indigenous seed collection and the coordination of indigenous revegetation projects within the Corangamite region. It explores a comprehensive method of assessing plant species, given our current understanding, to give clear seed collection ranges that will guide best practice. By providing these guidelines, it is hoped that improved seed collection methods will be adopted to maintain the genetic diversity of precious remnants, individual species and revegetation projects.
Technical
Demand and supply of native seed and seedlings in community revegetation – a survey
This report presents the results of a national survey conducted by FloraBank and Greening Australia in May 1999. The survey focused on the use of native seed and seedlings1 by people directly involved in revegetation at the community level and their expectations of demand and supply. It builds on the results of previous consultation and survey work by FloraBank to complete the picture about native seed as it is collected, stored and used for revegetation work in Australia.
Reports
A survey of collection, storage and distribution of native seed for revegetation and conservation purposes - The major focus of the report is on community-based seed operations that support revegetation and landcare initiatives, but the report broadly describes the collection, storage and distribution of native plant seed for revegetation purposes across Australia.
Reports
Native Seed in Australia: SUMMARY FINDINGS AND DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS
The FloraBank project seeks to improve the availability and quality of native seed and plant material for revegetation and conservation purposes in Australia. It provides support, advice and assistance to collectors, seedbank managers and distributors of native seed and plant material. FloraBank seeks to enhance existing networks between seedbanks and plant collections . The project will assist with training and provide guidelines for the collection, storage and handling of seed to local, regional and community-based seedbanks and groups. FloraBank encourages practices that protect Australia's biodiversity.
Reports
Seed drying and extraction involves the removal of seed from the fruit following collection. These processes should be carried out as soon as possible after collection and care must be taken to avoid any damage to the seed, which may reduce viability and longevity. Seed is rarely fit for immediate storage following collection, requiring either drying or de-pulping, extraction from the fruit and further cleaning. The methods for drying and extraction are many and varied and depend very much on the type of fruit, seed and equipment available.
General